Talent Management
Annual Mid-Year Source Guide
SEE PAGE 27
Volume XIII, Issue 3  
June/July 2008 US$10.00
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A Publication of the International Association for Human Resource Information Management • www.ihrim.org
Cover
Departments

Up.link
Ed Colby, Kronos Incorporated
Guest Editor

In My Opinion
Taking Ownership of your Career Development
By Jacqueline Kuhn, Kuhn Consulting Group

Functional Focus
Employee Selection: Maximizing Performance and Minimizing Legal Exposure
By Fumiko Kondo, Intellilink

Executive Corner
On-Demand Sales Compensation/Sales Performance Management
By Michael Torto, Centive

Executive Corner 2
Controlling Cost Overruns during Program Design
By Tonda Franklin, Deloitte Consulting, LLP

Global Perspective
Battle for Talent in Asia Could Threaten Business Growth
By Shelley Schmoker, Stepstone Solutions

New in the Market
CyberShift
Robert Farina, CEO

Private Eye
Protecting Sensitive Employee Information
By Dr. Donald F. Harris, HR Privacy Solutions

In Review
Human Capital Management:
Achieving Added Value Through People
A book review by Marcia Mather Barkley, CedarCrestone

The Back Page
Going on an HRMS Honeymoon
By Elliott Witkin, Ultimate Software
FEATURES
 
The State of Talent Management – A Call to Arms
By Heidi Spirgi, Knowledge Infusion
To prevent talent management from becoming just another temporarily hot, but rapidly cooling business trend, and to unleash its promise of transformation, end users and vendors must break with the past and adopt entirely new people, process and technology models. Organizations need to radically rethink how they manage talent and deploy enabling technologies. Vendors need to adopt new development models that reflect the fact that talent management is a business strategy and requires new levels of usability, operational system integration and decision support capabilities.

Can the Talent Management Suite Finally Fix Competency Management?
By Leighanne Levensaler, Bersin & Associates
Competency management, as a foundation process for talent management, is businesscritical. Without the foundation of standard competencies and profiles, the talent management suite cannot realize its full potential in supporting critical talent initiatives. And without the suite, the discipline of competency management, most notably in the area of functional competencies, is arduous, inconsistent and often rendered unsustainable.

Unicorns, the Tooth Fairy and the Complete Talent Management Suite
By Ed Newman, The Newman Group
History has shown that any solution that tries to impose a system that users are not ready to accept will simply not get used. The good news is that we have seen tremendous advances, both in the technology that drives talent management and in the ways companies have put that technology to work. As companies continue to integrate processes, the practicality of a complete talent management solution will become more apparent.

Work Force Planning as a Competitive Advantage:
Enabling Success in a Services Business
By Thomas Stachura and Eric Lesser, IBM Global Business Services
The global talent market is changing rapidly and bringing with it profound changes to the cost structure of entire industries. While the most acute impact is being felt in the services marketplace, few organizations will be exempt from the challenges ahead. Those firms that establish work force management as an executive imperative will be best positioned to thrive on the battlefield even as it is being reshaped.

Creating an Integrated Talent Management Technology Strategy
By Ron Hanscome, HRchitect
Creating an ITM technology strategy can serve as a solid foundation for your firm’s talent management technology investments over the next five years, and help you successfully negotiate what promises to be some turbulent times in the ITM marketplace. By thoroughly combining the internal view of your firm’s critical issues with a strong understanding of the HCM marketplace, you can develop a technology strategy that is strong and agile enough to support your organization’s objectives.

Annual Mid-Year Source Guide
 
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